Morning Sickness: Remedies, Suggestions & Research

Morning Sickness: Remedies, Suggestions & Research

Please note: I am NOT affiliated with any of the mentioned companies, and I do not receive any sort of reimbursement from sharing their products other than occasional free samples that are sent to my office (which is how I was introduced to several of them!). Some of these companies have offered discount codes for my readers, and I’m passing those on when available, at no benefit to myself!

As a mom who has struggled with severe morning sickness with most of my pregnancies, I know from experience how incredibly difficult and challenging those first months can be when you feel so miserable! In fact, the mere thought of going through those early weeks and months of sickness makes me desperate to find some type of relief to try. Because of this, I’ve spent quite a bit of time reading any new research, thoughts and suggestions that I can get my hands on regarding combating morning sickness over the past couple of years. My hope with this post is to help you understand what might be going on under the surface, and to provide you with a number of suggestions and resources so that you can hopefully find something that works for you! I know each mom (and each pregnancy!) can respond differently, and that there is NO cure-all that works for everyone. But sometimes you find out about something that can make a difference, so my hope is that you might discover something new that can bring some relief to you as you nourish and carry that tiny baby that is already requiring so much from mama!

For the foundation, it’s important to be caring for your body BEFORE pregnancy whenever possible. If you haven’t done so, I would highly recommend that you take the time to read Real Food For Pregnancy by Lily Nichols. Having a high quality diet in place that is low in simple carbs and refined sugar and high in quality protein has made a big difference for many moms, but this provides the most help for morning sickness if this has been a way of life long before pregnancy. Along these same lines, taking the time to do a liver cleanse and possibly a candida cleanse have made a big difference in pregnancy health for moms.

Talking about the liver brings me to the first important suggestion for morning sickness relief, and that is LIVER HEALTH. As you know, a mom’s body works hard to support the massive amount of growth that is happening for baby during the first weeks after conception, and one of the organs under a lot of stress is the liver. It is fascinating to study into this more, and realize how gentle support of the liver can help alleviate the severity of morning sickness (you can read more about this here). A great way to provide liver support is through taking Milk Thistle twice a day (and if you are planning a pregnancy, start taking this a couple of months before pregnancy for even better success!). Some good Milk Thistle options are: Jarrow Milk Thistle  & Natural Hope Herbals Milk Thistle Tincture.  If you want more support (and possibly more success), consider taking a liver support complex such as the pregnancy-safe tincture from  Mountain Meadow Herbs Liver Glow II. This product from Earthly Wellness includes dandelion which is another herb that provides liver support, along with some additional herbs to aid in reducing nausea: Mama’s Tummy Relief (use code “gentlemidwife” for 10% off your first order from them!). Another form of liver support comes through the addition of lemons to your diet, which is most easily done by squeezing fresh lemon juice into your water that you sip on throughout the day (add some honey for a bit of a natural sugar boost!).

Another factor that can make morning sickness worse, and be especially problematic when a mama is vomiting often, is maintaining good hydration and electrolyte balance. Staying on top of this before it gets to the point of needing IV treatment is key, and one of the ways to help with this is having some high-quality electrolyte drinks available (that are not full of artificial flavors & dyes like Gatorade!). A few good choices that I’ve personally tasted an tested are: GoodOnYa Organic (this one tastes like delicious lemonade, yet it has only healthy ingredients: use the code “gentlemidwife” for 10% off + free shipping on your order!), Nectar (another organic, sugar-free option with multiple flavors), LMNT (available in several different flavors-you can purchase a sample mix on Amazon to get you started), and DripDrop. You can even make popsicles out of these electrolyte drinks in order to sip on them…just make it a priority to stay hydrated and prevent your electrolytes from orbiting out of order…we want to prevent the need for an IV or other intervention whenever possible!

A “newer” remedy that I am finding quite fascinating is that of additional magnesium supplementation for morning sickness relief. Here’s a couple of articles that go into more detail: Magnesium for Morning Sickness Relief, & Magnesium for Morning Sickness: My Story. If I have another baby, I’m definitely planning to try this idea! Besides swallowing pills or drinking magnesium-containing drinks (which many sick moms can’t handle), a few ways to supplement with magnesium that might be easier on your stomach are creams and sprays. Pink Stork carries this  Magnesium Spray for Morning Sickness, and a local company that I highly recommend carries this cream: Shade Mt. Naturals Magnesium Cream . Another magnesium cream I have used personally is this one: 8 Sheep Organics Magnesium Cream

If you’ve read other posts on my blog or talked with me long, you probably have heard how strongly I feel about incorporating high quality probiotics into your life for pregnancy, nursing and newborn health…and now I’m finding proof that probiotics can also help with morning sickness! These two articles show how: Study: Probiotics Reduce Nausea & Vomiting  and Study Finds Probiotics Significantly Improve Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy. Based on this research, as well as knowing how beneficial probiotics are to your overall health, it seems like it can’t hurt anything to increase or start your probiotic intake during the early weeks/months of pregnancy. If you’re looking for some good quality options, here are a few that have been recommended by other midwives and clients that I trust: Klaire Labs Therbiotic Complete, This Is Needed: Prenatal Probiotic, and Entegro:Flourish. Another way to increase your probiotic consumption is through fermented foods, such as raw sauerkraut and drinks like Kefir. Some moms have found the “sparkling” aspect of water kefir to be especially appealing while feeling sick, and many stores carry options such as Kevita in the cold drink section. You can also learn How to Make Water Kefir at Home or purchase something like this: Coco-Biotic Coconut Water Kefir

Some moms can obtain relief by supplementing with some specific vitamins & nutrients. Adding a few drops of this Liquid PhosFood by Standard Process to your drinking water (it tastes similar to lemon) has been beneficial to a few clients. Other times your body really needs some additional B vitamins, both for the B6 that specifically helps with nausea, and for the energy that is so lacking during the first trimester! My favorite B complex for those early weeks is the Max BnD Fermented B complex that helped me SO much with my last pregnancy. Whatever type of B vitamin you find, make sure that is contains bio-available forms, such as folate and methylated Bs, in order to obtain the most benefit. Jarrow and Seeking Health are two good brands to purchase.

Now we’ll move on to some random suggestions and options that have helped other moms (thanks to so many who shared in response to my question on what has helped!):

  • Hard Candies Specific for Morning Sickness: Morning Sickness Sweets by Pink Stork,  UpSpring Stomach Settle Drops , PreggiePop Drops & Tummy Drops are several good options to choose from.
  • Ginger: many people find ginger helps to settle the stomach, and you can try it in the form of Ginger Ale, Ginger supplements, or even through chews & candies such as these: Gin-Gins Ginger People Candy & Chews
  • Pink Stork offers a product called Total Morning Sickness Relief that contains needed vitamins & minerals for nausea.  
  • Herbal tinctures formulated specifically for morning sickness: Wishgarden Calm-A-Tum, BrighterMornings from Natural Hope, StomachAid from MMH, & Nausea Relief Tincture from HerbLore.
  • Acupressure in the form of Sea-Bands is helpful for some moms: Research on relief of nausea from Sea-Bands
  • Frequent snacking (don’t let your stomach get empty!), and eating something light before you get out of bed in the morning. Make sure you’re getting protein in whenever possible, even adding it to smoothies if needed!
  • Daily mineral supplement, such as this Fulvic-Humic Acid Mineral Blend available through VitaCost.
  • 1 gel cap of Heather’s Tummy Care Peppermint Oil Caps before each meal for 3-5 days, adjust as needed.
  • Fruit Juice popsicles
  • Some moms find that they need to quit taking daily prenatal vitamins during this time, as they can be too hard on the already sensitive stomach. Don’t stress if you need to do this-you & baby will both do better overall if you can keep food down, and this is more important than the vitamins during these weeks! Remember, baby needed the vitamins the most during the first few weeks, so by the time morning sickness hits with a vengeance this key foundation is over, so the goal is keeping mom hydrated and healthy! An alternative is to find a different vitamin and see if it might be gentler on your stomach. There are gummies, powders and pills, so another form may work during these initial weeks, especially if it does not contain iron which can be particularly hard on a queasy stomach.

IF you really are struggling to keep anything down, and need to move past the natural supplement stage, don’t hesitate to reach out to your care provider for additional support. Some moms MUST have prescription meds to survive these months, and that is totally warranted depending on the situation. Other moms need to have an occasional IV in order to restore hydration, and we are thankful for these interventions when they are desperately needed. Some over-the-counter yet more medically-based solutions are:

In closing, here are a few other blogs that contain more suggestions on how to find relief from the challenges of morning sickness: Wellness Mama: How to Avoid Morning Sickness & Natural Morning Sickness Remedies

I would love to hear from you readers: what did you find helpful?? Any suggestions that aren’t on this list? Did anything listed here benefit you? What did you find helped from one pregnancy to another? Thanks so much for sharing so that we can all learn and hopefully be better able to handle these early weeks and months of pregnancy!

Pre-conception Considerations: Things to Think About Before Getting Pregnant

Pre-conception Considerations: Things to Think About Before Getting Pregnant

I’ve had several ladies reach out this year asking for information to consider as they hope to conceive sometime in the next few months. As I started replying to some of these inquiries, I realized that it might be helpful for others in similar positions to have some of this information at their fingertips. My hope is that some of these suggestions can help you to achieve the healthiest pregnancy possible as you actively prepare your body for the amazing stress and strength that growing a baby places on your entire system-this is certainly worth seriously considering and prepping for, and I can guarantee you won’t regret any time and effort you invest before pregnancy!

Let’s start at the beginning:

  • Educate Yourself on Your Hormones and Cycle:
    • Understanding how your body works, and how to read your fertility signs (temperature, cervical mucous, etc.) can make a huge difference in both your ability to conceive and in determining an accurate due date. There are some disorders or challenges that can be identified early on if you have been keeping track of your fertility signs, and this can save you time, money and heartache if you know what to look for and when to get medical intervention. Simple things such as knowing you ovulate “late” compared to traditional due date calculators can save you the challenge of being considered “overdue” when you actually didn’t have an accurate due date to start with!
    • For better understanding, I highly recommend the book Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Weschler. This guide helps you to really get to know how the women’s body works, how to chart your cycle, and how to understand all the information you are pulling together. The TCOYF app is also a great way to track your cycle, and it’s free! Another helpful book on the subject is The Fifth Vital Sign by Lisa Hendrickson-Jack (as a disclaimer, I JUST ordered this book and have it sitting in my “to read” pile-it looks great, but I haven’t read through it yet!).
    • For those particularly wanting to use fertility tracking as a guide to Natural Family Planning, the Art of Natural Family Planning Student Guide is a good way to delve into some of the details, which can also be an aid in achieving pregnancy.
  • Birth Control/Hormonal Contraception:
    • If you’ve been on hormonal contraceptives, it’s important to remember that it can take up to three months for normal cycles and fertility to return. The sooner you can get off any hormonal BC the better for  your overall health! Aviva Romm has a great article on fertility issues after hormonal contraceptives and getting off the pill here: Post Pill Reset and I highly recommend the new documentary The Business of Birth Control for better understanding of how hormonal contraceptives can negatively affect your overall fertility and health while providing an introduction to other non-hormonal options.
  • Deal with Any Current Health Concerns Now
    • Do you have weight you need to gain or loose? Start understanding healthful eating, and work on that now BEFORE  you add pregnancy to the mix! I’ll add more on diet below, but healthful eating habits should begin now, and will provide a great foundation for the demands of pregnancy on your body.
    • Are you currently on any medication that could have a negative effect on a developing baby? Many health challenges (such as elevated BP) can be managed by diet, lifestyle and supplement changes, and these are best achieved before pregnancy. If you’re hoping to have a low-risk delivery at home, this is even more important to consider, as any compilation of medications can increase your risk and rule out homebirth. Also, remember that you should be under the care of a physician or medical provider before attempting to wean off any medications, especially for BP, anxiety, depression, etc. You need to do this safely, and sometimes these changes can take time!
    • Thyroid health: many women these days experience thyroid imbalances, and it can make a huge difference on your ability to carry a healthy pregnancy if you are on top of these imbalances before pregnancy, and have a provider who can work with any sort of needed thyroid medication especially during the early days of pregnancy. Learn more about thyroid and it’s effect on pregnancy by reading Aviva Romm: Thyroid in Pregnancy
  • Learn more about healthy food choices:
    • There are so many things to learn about how food and our daily choices affect the way in which our body works! From supporting the organs, optimizing brain function, regulating blood sugar…the food we eat has so much to do with how our entire body operates. Add to this the growth and development of an additional entire human body and placental organ, and you’ll start to get a glimpse of how important solid nutrition is to your body and that of your future baby! The best book on the subject that I have read is Lily Nichol’s Real Food For Pregnancy, and I would encourage any woman who is pregnant or considering pregnancy to read it and really digest her wisdom and suggestions. Lily covers more than just diet, and her overall suggestions when it comes to regulating blood sugar, exercise guideline, and prenatal vitamin recommendations are all amazing and educational.
  • Support your Liver!
    • This might seem like an odd topic, but did you know that your liver performs under extra stress during pregnancy? There are many pregnancy complications that can arise when the liver is not functioning well, and there are some studies that suggest that a healthy, supported liver can reduce the amount of morning sickness a mom might experience. With all of these factors on the table, I highly recommend either purchasing a liver cleanse and using it a few months before getting pregnant, or at least taking a high-quality Milk Thistle supplement for a month or two before conception, and continuing to take it during the first trimester. Here is an article that addresses this further: Milk Thistle for Morning Sickness
  • Prenatal Vitamins:
    • Start your research on prenatal vitamins now, and begin taking them daily. Remember, the critical time for baby’s development are in the early weeks, so your body needs to start getting a good foundation of nutrients so that your body is ready to nourish the developing brain, organ and other nutrient needs of a growing tiny baby. Many moms end up sick enough that they cannot continue taking prenatal vitamins during part of the first trimester, so having this foundation laid ahead of time is key!
  • Further Reading:
    • If you’re wanting to read more about how to optimize your fertility and prepare well, many providers recommend the book It Starts with The Egg. Rebecca Fett goes into detail about diet, supplements and other foundational principles of helping your body to achieve healthy conception!

In closing, I hope you’ve found these suggestions informative! I’d love to hear what else you would add to this list, and what has helped you as you’ve prepared for pregnancy. Maybe you’re not pregnant yet, but you’ve found a great resource…or maybe you followed some preconception guidelines and are currently in the middle of pregnancy…either way, I’d love to hear what you found most helpful!

2021 Year-End Update from Gentle Delivery

2021 Year-End Update from Gentle Delivery

As I think back over this past year, it is with a sense of gratefulness for the ways that God has led, protected and provided. 2021 has included more complications, challenges and adrenaline rushes than I’ve ever had in one year’s time since I began practicing as a midwife 12 years ago! The additional gray hairs accumulated over the months prove this, and I am ending the year feeling like I’ve gained a level of experience that I honestly wouldn’t have minded doing without. However, I’ve also been reminded that this is WHY a midwife takes training seriously, and I’m more committed than ever to doing my best to assist families in safe births, even when at times this requires a different birth location than what we had hoped for, or more invasive assistance than what I prefer to provide.

            Besides being the most intense year complication-wise and the most stressful year when it comes to constant changes & research due to the ever-changing Covid landscape, it was also my busiest year baby-wise! I had the honor of helping to welcome 6 girls and 11 boys by the time the last December babies arrived. Weight ranges were fairly average: smallest was 6#8oz and the biggest was 9#9oz. While a couple of little ones came a week or two early, most typically went on the later side with two babies waiting until 13 days past their due date. Three babies made child #6 for their families, and two boys were the first ones for their families. While there were several long labors and many hours spent with a family before the birth, one little guy was in a big enough hurry that he made his appearance in his home before I did! As usual, birth always has an element of surprise that keeps us all on our toes.

Lynelle, Myself & Lanna

            I was blessed to work with several great assistants this year! These ladies really help to lift my load, and add a lot to our team. After assisting with births throughout the past 6 years, Lynelle is sensing a need to step back for a time, so she won’t be seen as frequently in the next year. Lanna began helping this spring at the height of our busy season, and has been such a blessing! She will continue to assist as her schedule allows, and there’s the potential of another assistant joining the team in the near future. I’ve also been grateful for the continued help of the midwifery community here in central PA: other assistants and midwives have been willing to fill in as needed, and I’m thankful to have had help available whenever I’ve needed an extra set of hands or someone to cover for a trip or emergency. I was especially thankful for RoseMarie’s willingness to cover for me this fall when our family had COVID, and I was thankful for the baby who so beautifully cooperated in waiting to arrive until I was recovered and my family was past quarantine!

Guerrero, Mexico Summer 2021

            On the home front, my little family is growing and doing well! In spite of lots of babies and the craziness this adds to our calendar, we were thankful to get to spend some time camping over the summer, as well as taking a family trip to Mexico to visit missionaries serving with the organization my husband works for. I couldn’t serve as a midwife without the amazing support of my husband Joel, who graciously steps in to care for everyone when mama disappears at a moment’s notice. With children ranging in age from almost 2 to 10, life at home is always exciting and active, and my girls can’t wait until THEY are old enough to “help mama at births”.

            A big thank you to each one of you who have trusted me to support you as you navigated your pregnancies and deliveries—it is something I count a privilege and honor! I love to hear from families, so please feel free to send an update and picture when you have a chance!

Many blessings as you head into the New Year,

Kelsey Martin & Gentle Delivery Midwifery Services

Be sure to check out the blog and Facebook page to stay updated on current news, helpful information, health suggestions, birth stories, and announcement of special events such as playdates!

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Preventing Group B Strep Colonization in Pregnancy

Preventing Group B Strep Colonization in Pregnancy

For clients of Gentle Delivery, you know that routine Group B Strep testing is offered to every expectant mom in accordance with the ACOG standards of care. While the pros and cons of testing and subsequent treatment plans are discussed in detail elsewhere, the purpose of this post is to help you to minimize your risk of developing Group B Strep colonization during pregnancy, thus promoting better health for you and baby (and increasing your chances of obtaining a negative test result!).

If you are interested in researching Group B Strep info, I’d strongly encourage you to read Aviva Romm’s article: Group B Strep in Pregnancy: What’s a Mom to do? You’ll find clear explanations of GBS, risks and benefits of antibiotic treatment, and tips on promoting health. This post by Wellness Mama also includes further links for study along with Katie’s suggestions for avoiding GBS colonization with natural methods: How I Avoided GBS Naturally  And finally, this article provides a few other options to consider while making decisions on prevention and treatment: Decrease Your Chances of GBS

As a practicing CPM in a state that does not offer licensure, I am currently unable to offer IV antibiotic treatment to GBS+ clients. This increases my desire to do all I can to help support a mom’s immune system and decrease the possibility of a GBS+ test result, as it greatly simplifies the care protocols and necessary decision making for clients and their families!

So here are the primary suggestions for making your vaginal flora inhospitable to Group B Strep:

  • High Quality Probiotics (if not started early on in pregnancy, then beginning at 28-32 weeks orally, adding vaginal support at 32-34 weeks)

“Many species of Lactobacillus have been shown to be beneficial to the vaginal flora; Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactobacillus rhamnosis are species known to be especially helpful for supporting healthy vaginal (and bladder) flora, while these and others, including L crispatus and L. salivarius strains, have been shown to to inhibit the growth of vaginal pathogens including Gardnerella vaginalis and Candida albicans, and also reducing the frequency of bladder infections in addition to vaginal infection.

In one study, 110 pregnant women at 35-37 weeks of gestation who were diagnosed by GBS culture as being GBS positive for both vaginal and rectal GBS colonization were randomly assigned to be orally treated with two placebo capsules or two probiotic capsules (containing L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri ) before bedtime until delivery. All women were tested for vaginal and rectal GBS colonization again by GBS culture on admission for delivery. Of the 99 who completed the study (49 in the probiotic group and 50 in the placebo group), the GBS colonization results changed from positive to negative in 21 women in the probiotic group (42.9%) and in nine women in the placebo group (18.0%) during this period. The researchers concluded that an oral probiotic containing L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri could reduce the vaginal and rectal GBS colonization rate in pregnant women.

In another study involving 57 healthy pregnant women, L. salivarus was taken daily by the 25 GBS positive women in the group from weeks 26 to 38 of pregnancy. At the end of the trial (week 38), 72% and 68% of the women were GBS-negative in the rectal and vaginal samples, respectively. The researchers concluded that this seemed to be an efficient method to reduce the number of GBS-positive women during pregnancy, decreasing the number of women receiving antibiotic treatment during labor and birth.”  (copied from Aviva Romm’s article here)

In light of these studies, and knowing that probiotics are vitally important to the health of both mom and infant for a variety of reasons, supplementing regularly with probiotics during pregnancy can be beneficial in more ways than one. For GBS specific support, it’s recommended that you begin supplementing orally at 28-32 weeks (though earlier is even better!), and then increasing your oral dosage and consider using a probiotic vaginally for at least 2-4 weeks before your Group B Strep test (and then continue the oral support through the rest of your pregnancy).

As you shop for probiotics, pay attention to the different strains it includes, as not all probiotics are created equal, and they will be most effective against GBS strains if it includes L. Rhamnosus, L. Reuteri and L. Salivarus.

Some brand suggestions that other midwives have given me are:

  • Diet Support
    • Eating a diet high in fermented foods/drinks (kefir, sauerkraut, kombucha, yogurt, etc.) help to promote a healthy gut flora.
    • Eliminating sugar and simple carbs are also effective in promoting beneficial gut flora.
    • Add 1-2 tbl of coconut oil into your daily diet for it’s antibiotic properties, specifically in the few weeks prior to testing.
    • Apple Cider Vinegar consumed daily or in capsule form may be helpful.
  • Vitamin C
    • Consuming 1000-2000mg of high quality vitamin C daily (in divided does) can help to increase your body’s immune response, which makes it more difficult for unhealthy microorganisms to grow. You can begin this regimen around 30 weeks.
  • Garlic/Allicin (active component of garlic)
    • Garlic has been used as an antimicrobial agent for generations, and for good reason. However, high doses of garlic can cause blood thinning, so I don’t recommend staying on high doses of garlic or allicin after obtaining your GBS test. But it is a treatment to consider to reduce the possibility of GBS colonization before getting tested. Currently there is a midwife practice conducting a study where participants are instructed to use Allicin Gel 2x daily for 12-14 days along with ingesting 180mg of Allicin capsules 2x daily for 12-14 days prior to testing. The basis for this study is from a preliminary study done in 2009 where Allicin was shown to reduce the possibility of early rupture of membranes and chorioamnionitis, both of which can be complications of GBS infection. Other methods of using garlic include: taking garlic capsules daily, consume raw garlic daily, and/or insert a raw garlic clove vaginally at night before going to bed.

            While we still have a lot to learn about Group B Strep (how exactly it is transmitted, best ways to treat it, and how to prevent it from the beginning), and while there still seem to be a few moms who naturally carry Group B Strep bacteria in their vaginal tract no matter what they try to do about it (antibiotic or otherwise!), one of the benefits of utilizing these suggestions is that they promote health for mom and baby regardless of the GBS presence (or lack thereof). While obtaining a negative Group B Strep test does eliminate a certain amount of worry, risk and decisions, the benefit to your body of increasing the good bacteria and gut flora through healthy foods, probiotic supplementation and other factors may provide long-term benefits that you will see later on. I’d highly encourage every pregnant mom to consider these suggestions, and wish each of you a healthy and safe pregnancy and birth!

            I’d also love to hear: did you try any of these prevention methods? How did it affect you and your GBS status? Did you test positive in one pregnancy and then negative in another? What was most beneficial for you?

A Mother’s Journey with Tongue Ties

A Mother’s Journey with Tongue Ties

If you’ve followed my blog for long, you’ll know that tongue & lip ties and nursing challenges are a passion of mine, especially after having experienced challenges with all of these factors with several of my own children. I’ve also been in contact with many moms who are struggling with nursing issues or fussy babies, and so many times there is a connection to either a tongue or lip tie (or both!). Recently, a mom shared her story in a Facebook Group for Moms that I’m part of. Her story touches on so many of the factors that I have seen and/or experienced, that I contacted her and asked for her permission to share her post with you all. I am so grateful, as Tanisha covers many factors to consider in her story, and I think it will be beneficial for many moms who might be struggling. If you are struggling with nursing issues, I really want to encourage you that you aren’t alone, and that there are answers out there!! And if you resonate with this story, I would love to hear about your experiences! It can help other moms when they can hear first-hand what worked for others in similar situations.

~Kelsey

Now on to our guest post, written earlier this year by Tanisha Gingerich:

**Shared by the author’s permission**

I thought I’d make a post for whoever it might concern, about our journey so far with tongue and lip ties. They are becoming increasingly common it seems, and I thought sharing my experience might be a good way to bring awareness so that any other moms going thru something similar can benefit from (or add to) what I’ve been learning.

A week post partum, I was scabbed from nursing, and in a lot of pain every time I fed Micoma. She was gaining well, so we probably could have made it work (a lactation consultant can help you and baby work past a multitude of feeding problems), but I knew from experience that although I could “make it work,” my milk supply was going to tank around 4-6 months. Ties can also cause speech, dental, and sleep issues down the road, along with a host of other problems.

So in the interest of short-term pain for the long-term good, I took Micoma in at a week old for a consultation and ended up getting her lip and tongue ties lasered right away so we could begin the healing and retraining process as soon as possible before bad nursing habits were formed.

I cried and prayed over her before they did the 3 minute procedure, and sobbed compulsively while they swaddled her and used a laser to cut the ties open. The woman doing the procedure was a mom too, and was so compassionate and kind with Micoma. Then they left us alone in a cozy room to nurse, and I heaved more sobs as I comforted my baby. Being able to hold and nurse her was probably just as healing for me as it was for her.

Her latch was instantly better. Over the next few days I had to continually remind myself of the long term good, as I did stretches on her wounds. To my relief, the stretches were done in under 30 seconds, and Micoma always recovered quickly… I soon realized she was screaming louder over getting her diaper changed than she was over the oral invasion, so that made me feel better. I told her all the time how brave she was, and gave her every comfort to guide her through the rough patch.

That first week dragged on for me. I hated having to keep stretches in my mind every 4-6 hours even thru the night—got kind of sick with dread thinking about it. I kept Micoma on Tylenol the first 2 days, and again on day 4 when there was a flare up of discomfort. Other than that though, she continued to eat and sleep very normally (not everyone has it so easy, some babies will hardly eat for a day or two, and cry all the time. Thankfully Micoma nursed for comfort, and seemed to tolerate gracefully any discomfort she was feeling). At one week we had a follow up appointment and they said everything was healing well and there was no reattachment. I was so relieved.

By the second week all was routine, and the scars were nearly healed up. Sometimes she wouldn’t even wake up when I did the stretches so I knew they weren’t painful. Currently we have just passed the 3 week mark, which means I can de-escalate the stretches rapidly and they will disappear in a few days. Hooray! One hurdle over. Now on to the next. I had a lactation consultant come at week 3, to help me teach Micoma new nursing/sucking habits. I learned so much!

First of all, babies begin practicing how to suck from week 12 in utero. This is how they build the oral strength they need for nursing. Unfortunately, when a part of their tongue is tied down, they are unable to fully lift and tone those muscles.  When they are born and begin nursing, the restrictions to their lip and or/tongue, make it hard or impossible for them to latch correctly or suck efficiently. As a result, nursing is laborious for them. You may hear a “clicking” noise or notice milk dribbling out the sides of their mouth, these are telltale signs. They frequently fall asleep while nursing, just from the strain it, and are unable to properly empty the breast. This can obviously cause low-weight issues, milk supply issues, and severe frustration to the baby. The baby will often resort to chomping or some other measure in an attempt to get milk, resulting it a lot of discomfort or pain for the mom.

But even after ties are released, there is still some work to do. Baby’s latch will probably be better right away, but you’ll need to help hertone her oral muscles and relearn how to suck correctly with the new range of motion in her mouth. I was given a series of simple tongue exercises to do with Micoma every day… they are more like games, and activate her reflexes to get her tongue moving, especially in the places she’s not used to lifting it.

Now, to back up a bit, there are two kinds of ties—lip ties and tongue ties. I’ve also heard of buchal ties (cheeks) but know very little about them at this point. A lip tie is easiest to spot (example of one in comments) and if a lip tie is present, a tongue tie is almost always present too—they tend to go hand in hand. Keep in mind that some care providers are not trained to look for *posterior* tongue ties (these are in the back of the mouth and not as obvious as anterior ones), so those often get missed. Ties vary in severity (where they are attached and how drastically they are affecting function of the lip/tongue. Sometimes it may be negligible).

Next thing I learned, tongue tied babies are notoriously “tight.” The tongue sits at the very top of the spine, and if there are restrictions in the tongue, you will see restrictions all the way down through the body. Sure enough, Micoma is very tight in her shoulder/neck area, has over compensated for it in her lower back, and has tight hips. Once again, I was given a series of simple rhythmic motions and stretches to loosen those areas up and bring everything into alignment. She has a bit of a “C” shape curve when she lies down, that’s another common sign of tongue-tie related tightness. (Pic in comments) I wish I would have known this with my oldest daughter Verona. She was incredibly C-shaped, and these stretches would have loosened up her uncomfortably tight muscles.

Looking back, both of my children before Micoma had ties of some kind. I always had to use a nipple shield with Verona, and I remember Benny getting so angry when I nursed him. My supply going down around 4 months was another telltale sign. Both children despised tummy time, which was most likely because of how tight they were in their neck and lower back. I suspect “ties” is some of why they slept so poorly and aggravated colic symptoms early on… In-efficient nursing brings more air into the stomach and causes gas discomfort/excessive spitting up. And in a very strange twist of fate, if the tongue cannot reach up to the top of the pallet and rest there while sleeping, the top of the mouth becomes domed, crowding teeth and restricting airway. This can lead to mouth breathing, sleep apnea, and dental issues.

Verona’s lip tie comes all the way down between her teeth, which is why she has a gap between her front teeth. Neither of the children seem to be having difficulty eating, speaking, or maintaining good dental hygiene and structure other than that. So I’ll just keep an eye on them, and only resort to doing anything about theirs at this point if I see it’s going to cause them major problems down the road. But I do grieve the suffering we all went thru with months of screaming colicky baby, and the eventual loss of breastfeeding bond. That pain far surpasses whatever me and Micoma went through the last month in laser-correction and recovery.

So for that reason, I would support moms in pursuing tie-releases if you feel it would be beneficial for your baby. As with everything child-related, there is controversy surrounding the issue—whether ties are really a thing, whether they’re a big deal, clipping or lasering, stretches or no stretches. In my case, I saw enough consequences in my last 2 children that I was willing to believe ties affect quality of life enough to warrant a minor surgery. Lasering has a lower rate of re-attachment and requires no stitches, so I went that route. And the stretches I did because Micoma tolerated them well and I was determined not to let the fibers re-attach while they were healing… and I grilled my caretaker about whether it was necessary, and she says she does see a fairly high rate of reattachment if stretches are not done. Albeit, I did the bare minimum I thought I could be get by with, and with good results. That was my story, you get to write your own. Decide what’s best for your child, whether that’s therapy to work past a tie, or a surgery to correct it, or whatever and don’t let people throw a lot of shame or fear onto you for it.

Currently I am pumping a few times a day and using an SNS (supplemental nursing system) several times a day to stimulate my supply and simultaneously get Micoma the extra food she sometimes can’t get herself. I’ll keep working with Micoma’s body and tongue to get everything loosened up and toned… hopefully within a month we’ll be at a place where she can keep my supply up on her own. In the mean time we’re not goning to go many places this month, just stay home and focus on the task at hand.

Many people take their children to chiropractors pre and/or post tie release for body work. It helps with nursing if your baby is aligned properly. For the time being, since I have bodywork I can do at home with her, I am skipping that… see if I can get by without it. Cranial Sacral therapy is another thing highly recommended… I don’t know, it could possibly be a legitimate thing with babies since their skulls are still un-fused and somewhat mobile, but I have heard of enough occultist ties connected to this practice done in adults that I plan to avoid it all together.

This post was not meant to diagnose or treat any illness. It’s my personal story and some things I learned along the way, left here for people to sift thru and take whatever is for them.

If, btw, you decide lasering is the right option for you (and you are local to central PA), I had a good experience with Dr. Katherman in York. Her office felt like such a warm and caring place to me, and she was on call at all hours if I had questions later. Also, do yourself a favor and hire a lactation consultant. You won’t regret it! Do a bit of research first and find one that people you know have had good experiences with (there are a few bad eggs out there). Again, I had a wonderful experience with the one I found, and I’ll link her website for reference.

Dr Katherman: https://www.cdepa.com

Jessica, Lactation Consultant: https://bornandfed.com

The cost to get two ties lasered was $750. I am going to turn it into my insurance sharing plan, but I do not know yet if they will cover it. The lactation consultant fee for an hour and a half session was $175. So it is a good chunk of change. But when compared to the potential costs of not doing it, it is a very reasonable investment.

I hope that’s everything. My mind is still kind of whirling from all the things I’m learning, so this was my way of processing it. Hoping it will be helpful to someone else.

P.S. Out of curiosity, I asked both the doctor and lactation consultant if ties have become more common recently or if they’re just being diagnosed more, so we’re more aware of them. They both said ties are becoming increasingly common. I don’t think even my mom’s generation would have seen very many, so this seems to be a rapidly developing problem. Presumably, Western diet and lifestyle as well as the declining quality of foods (grown from nutrient-depleted soils) plays a role. There seems to be evidence to support that lack of folate and other B vitamins in the early stages of embryonic development contributes to ties forming—or the presence of the synthetic B vitamin folic acid commonly in prenatals and fortified foods. And others say there are indications that genetic mutations (the MTHFR gene) play a role. But no definitive studies have been done, that I know of. Everything is speculation at this point. Someone gave me two articles so I’m linking them below. My midwife gave me some resources to dig into and I’m hoping to do more research to see if this plague is avoidable.

Connection to MTHFR gene: https://www.checkupnewsroom.com/a-pediatricians-goes-in…/

Connection to regular folic acid intake: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31835174/

I maintain a decently healthy diet and take quality supplements including methylated B vitamins so it’s hard to believe that was the cause of all 3 children having ties. Except that I was under exponential stress the past few years, and as I understand it B vitamins are created in the gut… if you have bad gut health or are under stress, B vitamins do not form well. So that could be a factor. Like I said, I’m going to keep digging and see what answers I can find.

Anemia During Pregnancy & Postpartum: what it is & what to do about it

Anemia During Pregnancy & Postpartum: what it is & what to do about it

If you are like many moms, struggling with low energy can be a challenge during pregnancy. Understanding how to support your body as it faces the increased demands of growing a baby can help you to have a better experience, and improve your recovery during the postpartum weeks. For many moms, the lack of energy is due to low hemoglobin levels, which can be linked to low iron. There are many ways to boost these levels naturally, thus providing your body & baby with the nutrients they both need in order to thrive!

What is Hemoglobin?

In a nutshell, hemoglobin is component of your blood that carries oxygen to your cells. If your hemoglobin count is low, you can experience some or all of the following symptoms:

  • Low energy
  • General Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath (especially after climbing stairs or exerting yourself)
  • Heart palpitations
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness

How do I find out if I have low hemoglobin?

Having routine labwork performed during pregnancy can tell you where your hemoglobin levels are. In my practice, we often check these levels towards the beginning of pregnancy, and then again after you reach 28 weeks of pregnancy. As you progress in pregnancy, your blood volume expands, preparing you to be able to handle the blood loss that occurs with delivery. For many women, their total volume increases over 25%, and tends to peak by the time you hit the beginning of the third trimester. Testing your hemoglobin soon after 28 weeks tells us how your body has handled this blood volume expansion, and gives us time to really hit support should your levels be low at this point in pregnancy.

What if my hemoglobin levels are low?

If your results are low, my first step is to look at all of your lab results to see if we can get a clue as to WHY they are low. There are a few different types of anemia, and the two most common in my practice are:

  • Iron Deficiency: caused by a lack of iron, which can show up as low hemoglobin combined with a low hematocrit ratio on your lab results.
  • B12/Folate Deficiency Anemia: caused by a lack of adequate B12 vitamins and folate, and can be indicated by an elevated “mean corpuscular volume” (abnormally large red blood cells) on your lab results in combination with a low hemoglobin level.

In occasional instances, low hemoglobin levels can also happen if a mom bleeds excessively after delivery. This is one of the reasons that it is so important to get your hemoglobin in an optimal place before birth, as it increases the body’s ability to handle blood loss. But if your hemoglobin is low and you need iron support after having your baby, the following suggestions will also pertain to you!

What can I do to bring up my hemoglobin?

Some key factors to consider as you weigh your options for iron and vitamin support:

  • Typically natural-based supplements take consistency and time to really be effective. This is why to start helping your body early, as the body will then have time to respond. Many iron and vitamin supports will take one to two weeks to really start working to bring levels up.
  • Look for products and options that are whole-food or plant based when possible, as these will cause less constipation and be able to be more easily utilized by your body.
  • Pay attention to labels, and stay away from supplements that contain synthetic ingredients. This is particularly key when it comes to “folate”, as you do NOT want the synthetic form called “folic acid”. Due to genetic issues, many women are unable to adequately absorb synthetic folic acid and synthetic forms of B vitamins, which increases the specific problem of B12/folate deficiency anemia. To understand more about folate and the importance of methylated vitamins, check out this article here by Wellness Mama.

Now onto options for increasing iron levels!

Borderline anemia: if your levels are borderline, and you are looking for some general ways to boost your levels and provide more support to your body, these are some great ways to start:

  • Use cast iron cookware for cooking.
  • Eat foods high in iron (beans, lentils, red meat, liver, spinach, turkey, pumpkin seeds, broccoli, black strap molasses, etc.)
  • Increase your vitamin C intake with a high-quality Vitamin C supplement once or twice daily.
  • Make sure you aren’t mixing calcium supplements with your iron-rich foods or supplements (they will block the absorption of the other, negating the benefits of either one!)
  • Alfalfa Tablets, Moringa capsules & Yellow Dock tincture.
  • Drink several cups Red Raspberry Leaf tea daily during the 2nd and 3rd trimesters (and during postpartum as well), or drink several cups of NORA tea daily (a combination of Nettles, Oatstraw, Red Raspberry Leaf and Alfalfa). To learn my favorite recipe for Red Raspberry Leaf, click here or for NORA tea, check out this link.

True Anemia Support: for those who need to seriously boost their hemoglobin levels, here are some additional supplements to consider, in addition to the list above:

Many moms have found this combination very effective at bringing up their iron quickly (combined with some of the above suggestions):

  • Liquid Chlorophyll (drink 2-3 tablespoons daily, and 1/4c. daily during the first week postpartum)
  • Hemaplex Tablets (make sure it’s these tablets, as they do not contained the synthetic forms of folate)
  • Desiccated Liver capsules (grass-fed organic is best)

Others have found the combination of Chlorophyll with one or two of the following to work for them:

For additional information on anemia during pregnancy, I’d encourage you to check out the following links:

And for more suggestions on anemia in general, Aviva Romm has some great suggestions here: Aviva Romm on Anemia

I’d love to hear from you: what has helped to bring your hemoglobin up, and help you have adequate iron levels during pregnancy and postpartum?

Basic Supplements for a Healthy Pregnancy

Basic Supplements for a Healthy Pregnancy

Are you confused with the myriad of pregnancy supplements out there, and wondering how to make the best choices that are good for you & baby while at the same time not depleting your budget? Have you wondered, too, which supplements are key and which aren’t actually necessary? And which supplements are going to actually provide you with the nutrients you need? And what are the basic supplements you should focus on? You’re certainly not alone in your musings!

As a midwife and a mom, I’ve had the same questions. I also know that it can be overwhelming to sort through brands, AND remember to take multiple vitamins and pills every day, especially if they have to happen at different times. I also want to make sure the moms and babies I’m caring for are getting the nutrients they need, which means NOT relying on the cheapest brands and options. If you’ve spent any amount of time researching options, you know that there lots of things to consider as you think about vitamins and supplements. Ideally, you want to use a brand that focuses on whole foods, organic sources, and includes bio-available nutrients (such as folate instead of synthetic folic acid). Of course, these vitamins aren’t going to be the cheapest ones available, which means that you will want to choose wisely, and consider using fewer supplements and making sure the ones you ARE taking are high-quality!

For those who have wondered, here is a list of the basic supplements that I routinely recommend to clients. Of course, more need to be added in the presence of specific conditions, but for most moms, these are the basics that I would encourage any mom to take during pregnancy (and while you’re nursing!):

For special considerations, these are typically the first recommendations:

  • B Vitamin (if dealing with low energy especially: your midwife can do blood tests to determine if it’s caused in part by a B vitamin or folate deficiency).
  • Iron (if low energy seems to be iron deficiency related)
  • Magnesium drink at night before bedtime to help promote restful sleep: Natural Calm
  • Trace Minerals to help with restless legs, leg cramps, muscle soreness: ConcenTrace Trace Mineral Drops

Most moms with low-risk pregnancies who are consuming a high-quality diet don’t need more than these to have a healthy pregnancy and healthy baby! For more information on understanding diet & supplements and their effect on mom and baby’s health (and what ingredients are important to be aware of!), I’d highly encourage you to check out the following sites:

Dr. Aviva Romm on Prenatal Vitamins

Lily Nichols on Folate vs. Folic Acid

Lily Nichols-information on diet and nutrition during pregnancy

And finally, if you’re looking for a place to purchase vitamins and supplements, I encourage all my clients to check out www.vitacost.com, as I typically find the best prices at that site!

I’d love to hear what prenatal vitamins and other supplements have worked for you! Feel free to share in the comments below so we can all learn together. And be sure to share this post with other moms that might benefit from the links and information!

Understanding Gestational Diabetes (and your testing options)

Understanding Gestational Diabetes (and your testing options)

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I recently worked on updating the information I give to clients on Gestational Diabetese screening during pregnancy. Compared to 12 years ago when I was first delving into midwifery studies, there is so much more helpful information out there about this subject! For this month’s blog post, I decided to share my updated “informed consent” handout (this is something that each client recieives in order to help them make a truly informed choice regarding their screening options), as well as some links that may be helpful for those who are wanting to research this topic further.

Informed Consent Regarding Glucose Testing and Screening for

Gestational Diabetes

What is Gestational Diabetes?

John Hopkins Medicine describes Gestational Diabetes as follows: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)  is a condition in which a hormone made by the placenta prevents the body from using insulin effectively. Glucose builds up in the blood instead of being absorbed by the cells.

Unlike type 1 diabetes, gestational diabetes is not caused by a lack of insulin, but by other hormones produced during pregnancy that can make insulin less effective, a condition referred to as insulin resistance. Gestational diabetic symptoms disappear following delivery. Approximately 3 to 8 percent of all pregnant women in the United States are diagnosed with gestational diabetes.

Although the cause of GDM is not known, there are some theories as to why the condition occurs: The placenta supplies a growing fetus with nutrients and water, and also produces a variety of hormones to maintain the pregnancy. Some of these hormones (estrogen, cortisol, and human placental lactogen) can have a blocking effect on insulin. This is called contra-insulin effect, which usually begins about 20 to 24 weeks into the pregnancy.

As the placenta grows, more of these hormones are produced, and the risk of insulin resistance becomes greater. Normally, the pancreas is able to make additional insulin to overcome insulin resistance, but when the production of insulin is not enough to overcome the effect of the placental hormones, gestational diabetes results.

For more information on understanding Gestational Diabetes and Insulin Resistance during pregnancy, I highly recommend checking into these websites: EvidenceBasedBirth.com and LilyNicholsRDN.com, and by reading Real Food for Pregnancy by Lily Nichols (available through my office lending library).

Risks Associated with GDM for mother and baby:

Ÿ Increased risk of developing Pre-eclampsia

Ÿ Increased risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes

Ÿ Maternal injury

Ÿ Increased risk of Cesarean section

Ÿ Shoulder dystocia

Ÿ Macrosomia (infant weight over 8lb 13 oz)

Ÿ Neonatal hypoglycemia

Ÿ Neonatal jaundice

Ÿ Stillbirth

Ÿ NICU stay

Ÿ Birth injury

Predisposing Risk Factors can include:

Ÿ Pre-pregnancy BMI >25

Ÿ Family history of diabetes

Ÿ GDM in previous pregnancy

Ÿ Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

Ÿ Chronic hypertension

Ÿ Maternal age over 25

Ÿ Ethnicity (African-American, Native American, Hispanic, South & East Asian, Pacific Islander)

ŸPrevious macrosomic infant

Ÿ History of Cardiovascular disease

ŸPoor nutrition

Potential Signs and Symptoms of GDM:

Not all mothers will have any symptoms, but these are indicators of the possible presence of GDM:

Ÿ Polyuria (excessive urinary output)

Ÿ Polydipsia (extreme thirst)

Ÿ Weakness

Ÿ Poor healing/susceptibility to infections

Ÿ Size large for dates

Ÿ Recurrent glucose in urine

Ÿ Recurrent yeast infections

Ÿ Ketones in urine

Ÿ Excessive weight gain

Ÿ Polyhydramnios (excessive amniotic fluid)

Ÿ Polyphagia (excessive hunger)

What are my testing options?

The American College of Obstetricians (ACOG) recommends universal screening for every mom between 24-28 weeks for pregnancy. Women with a history of GDM or have high-risk factors are encouraged to screen as early as possible in pregnancy, and typically Glucola is used as the glucose load. Due to the preservatives, dyes and other ingredients found in Glucola, other glucose options are offered, such as a dye-free glucose drink, or the option of consuming 28 jelly beans per the article published by American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. If opting for either of these tests, it is recommended to eat an average of 150 grams of carbohydrates daily for three days before testing. The standard testing procedure is as follows:

  • 1 hour Oral Glucose Challenge test: This involves drawing blood for blood sugar testing one hour after consuming a 50g glucose load (non fasting). Blood sugar levels should be under 140mg/dl. If the blood sugar levels are higher than this, then a 3 hour test is recommended to confirm or rule out a diagnosis of GDM.
  • 3 hour Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT): This four-step test is performed after fasting for at least 12 hours, and includes drinking a 100g glucose drink. Blood is drawn fasting, and then again at 1, 2 and 3 hours after drinking the glucola. If two or more levels are out of range, the mother is diagnosed with GDM. Consultation with a physician is recommended, and transfer of care may become necessary should diet changes be insufficient to keep sugar levels within target ranges.

During recent years, more physicians are becoming comfortable with an alternative to the above traditional protocol as described here by Rebecca Dekker at Evidence Based Birth (near the end of the article):

Home blood sugar monitoring: “Another alternative could be for people to monitor their blood sugar levels at home and discuss the results with their care provider. This is another controversial way to screen for GDM. We didn’t find any studies on GDM screening that compared home blood sugar monitoring versus a standard oral glucose drink.

However, we hear of some people using this method. Basically, they are following a similar path that people do when they’ve been actually diagnosed with GDM. Usually, after a GDM diagnosis, mothers monitor their blood sugar levels four times a day, once after fasting (first thing in the morning) and again after each meal (AGOG, 2018).

The ADA and ACOG recommend that fasting blood sugar levels should be <95 mg/dL, and post-meal blood sugar levels should be <140 mg/dL at 1-hour. Other recommendations for healthy blood sugar level targets during pregnancy are even lower. For example, the California Diabetes and Pregnancy Program (CDAPP) Sweet Success recommends fasting/premeal levels at <90 mg/dL and post-meal levels at <130 (Shields and Tsay, 2015).

Monitoring your blood sugar levels at home might be an option for someone who cannot take a glucose test because of the side effects, or prefers not to drink the glucose solution. However, home blood sugar monitoring is demanding and has some drawbacks. Mothers may have to purchase their own testing kits, and they have to remember to set alarms and carry their testing supplies with them throughout the day. Some people would consider it a major downside that blood sugar monitoring requires constant finger sticks, although others may not mind. Since home blood sugar monitoring is usually done after GDM diagnosis, there is no clear-cut standard for screening/diagnosing gestational diabetes based on home blood sugar checks. It’s important to discuss any results with a care provider to determine if testing can be stopped, if home monitoring should be continued, or if consistent high values mean that treatment for GDM is needed. Also, with this method, it is important that mothers follow their normal diet while testing, to get a “real-life” picture of their blood sugar results over time.”

While this testing method has gained acceptance in some medical communities, it is important to note that it has not been officially documented as a standard for diagnosing GDM. However, research is ongoing, and this method does provide you with an accurate day-by-day picture of how your body is responding to your normal diet. For clients who choose to do home glucose testing (whether in addition to or in place of the Glucose Challenge Test), I am happy to provide you with a glucometer, supplies and a chart that you can use to track your glucose readings for two weeks.

What if I have Gestational Diabetes?

Many women are able to control GDM through regular exercise and dietary changes. For clients who test positive for GMD, I will ask you to read Lily Nichol’s books Real Food for Gestational Diabetes and Real Food for Pregnancy, and we will discuss a plan for your care, including necessary diet changes and logging, home glucose monitoring, and exercise routines. If additional insulin is needed to control sugar levels, this will result in a transfer of care, as insulin-dependence significantly raises risk factors making a homebirth not a safe option for mother and baby.

Conclusion: Informed Consent

I highly recommend checking out these websites for more information on Gestational Diabetes Screening:

I also would encourage you, regardless of your choice to screen for GDM, to spend time reading Lily’s Nichol’s books (mentioned above) and implementing her dietary suggestions for pregnancy. Excellent information is available at her website: LilyNicholsRDM.com

As an expectant mom, it is your responsibility to choose first whether to screen for Gestational Diabetes, and if so, which method of screening to utilize. This document is intended to begin the conversation and aid you in researching what is best for your health and the health of your baby, and I welcome your further discussion and questions at any time.

In your Client Information Folder you will find a document entitled “Consent & Waivers for Common Procedures”, on which is listed screening for Gestational Diabetes. Please indicate your choice on this form, after you have spent time reading the risks and benefits of screening and the type of screening.

Did you find this information helpful? I’d love to hear about your experience with GDM and your testing/treatment options! If you’re wanting to research this topic further, here’s some links to other helpful posts, many written by moms sharing how they made a decision regarding GDM screening for their pregnancies (note, many of these posts are personal opinons shared for your consideration, though they may not include documented studies or be supported by general medical literature):

If you have more to add, or resources to share, feel free to comment below! 

Resources and Info on COVID-19: Links, Practice Changes, Recommendations & More

Resources and Info on COVID-19: Links, Practice Changes, Recommendations & More

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With the COVID-19 crisis in full swing, it can be hard to know where to go for good information. As a midwife wanting to give my clients the best, up-to-date, evidenced based care as possible, I have found it extremely challenging to navigate all the information being thrown around as everyone scrambles to learn what they can about this new virus. Even information from reputable sources can contradict each other, leaving one’s head spinning, and making you unsure of what measures should be taken to protect your clients and your loved ones from any unnecessary exposure, while also caring for the emotional and physical needs of expectant moms! I’m sure you’re probably in a similar boat, so I’m wanting to make available some information sources for you as you try to understand how the current crisis may or may not affect you, your baby, your care, and your birth.

Here are some links that I have found helpful:

Aviva Romm Series on Covid-19 Info

WHO info for Pregnant and Nursing Mothers

National Association of Certified Professional Midwives: Covid-19

WHO Info-graphs

While information is changing on a day-to-day basis, I am currently implementing the following changes to my practice in order to minimize risk for my current clients, and enable safe midwifery care to continue in my community:

  • I am available to answer any questions clients might have via email or phone/text at any time.
  • Pushing prenatal visits further apart to minimize person-to-person contact.
  • Practicing social distancing and limited exposure for myself and my family, and not seeing any clients if myself or one of my family members are sick.
  • I will be performing April prenatal visits in client’s homes to reduce the risk of transmission or exposure. My current client load is light as I am just coming off of maternity leave, so this feels like the best option as I look into ways to make my home office space more practical for office visits due to the stringent recommended disinfectant protocols.
  • I am not taking on new (non-repeat) and/or long distance clients during April. I hope to resume new client consults and prenatals in May, but will base this on information as it becomes available, as well as on how able I am to handle the extra time needed to maintain the possible new protocols, etc. Having to unexpectedly homeschool two children this month, as well as juggling the demands of a nursing infant (and trying to understand what risk there could be to her health) all combine to make my days extra full right now, without adding in the hours of research needed to stay on top of current medical news!
  • If you are just beginning to look into the option of homebirth due to concerns with exposure at the hospital, I would suggest you begin by reading these two links:

I am also asking clients to follow these guidelines:

  • Please reschedule your visit if you or one of your family members are experiencing any of the typical Corona symptoms, including:
    • Fever
    • Coughing
    • Shortness of breath
    • And remember that Covid-19 care is outside of the scope of practice for your midwife to advise you on, so please contact the proper medical authorities if you suspect you may have contracted it!
  • Try to limit your exposure to illness by practicing safe social distancing from ill persons, and practicing good hygiene and hand washing.
  • Due to the unknown severity of respiratory complications for both mom and infant, a home birth will be out of the question if you test positive for COVID-19 over the time you are in labor.
  • Realize that there may be some changes in birth practices as more information and studies become available, so feel free to reach out with any questions, and stay tuned as I continue to research and keep you up to date on current research and practice guidelines/changes. Some of these changes may include restrictions on children attending prenatal appointments, amount of people in attendance at your birth, etc. As time goes by, I hope to have more concrete information to guide our practice protocols for the safety of everyone.

I would also strongly encourage all expectant moms to do what you can to boost your body’s (and your family’s!) natural ability to fight any virus (there are other illnesses out there you don’t want to catch, as well!). I don’t think we need to just sit back and hope we don’t get sick-you can be proactive in assisting your body in being able to resist and fight illness right now. There are some great resources available that help you to consider how healthy eating (low sugar, lots of whole foods) combined with adding some immune-boosting supplements (such as high-quality vitamin C, regular vitamin D, probiotics and others) and regular exercise can help you and your family to stay healthy and strong. Here are some resources to get you started in thinking about the possibilities:

Advice from a Pediatrician

Aviva Romm on Natural Remedies

If you’re interested on hearing additional perspective on the crisis from a well-known, more “naturally minded” pediatrician, then you may appreciate Dr. Sear’s podcast series: Coronavirus Update: Are We Doing it Right? Pt. 1

And finally, some practical ways to help you handle the extra challenges from social distancing right now, tips on reducing anxiety, and helps in understanding more about the virus: COPE Updates on Covid-19

If you have found a source to be especially helpful as you navigate the news surrounding Covid-19, I’d love to hear about it. And if you are in a different area, I’d love to hear how your midwife/care provider is implementing changes to their practices. Blessings to all of you expectant mamas navigating this new territory during this time in your life-I know it’s a challenge, and I am committed to continuing to provide you with personal, safe, gentle midwifery care!

 

Miscarriage Questions: 10 Year Anniversary Interview Part 3

Miscarriage Questions: 10 Year Anniversary Interview Part 3

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Interview Pt 3: Miscarriage

This month I’m continuing to answer questions that were submitted by readers for Gentle Delivery’s 10th anniversary “ask the midwife” series (feel free to check out Part One and Part Two if you haven’t read them yet!) There were several questions asking about miscarriage and how that affects future care, and I’ve decided to make that the focus for this month. Sadly, miscarriage is a reality for many moms, and I’ve had more moms than usual experience miscarriage throughout this past year. Hopefully some of these suggestions and this information can be a blessing to those of you walking through this valley, or those of you wondering what happens next…

What is your approach when a client has a miscarriage? What do you say or do to help her through the process, and if she gets pregnant again later, does your prenatal care for her and the baby look different in any way?

This is one of the “flipsides” of midwifery practice…it’s not always dealing with excitement and new babies. Oftentimes miscarriage occurs “out of the blue”, and usually there is no obvious explanation, even though we usually wish we knew why, or what happened.

Typically, a client will have just been in touch to let me know that they are excited to set up a time to talk about homebirth (or resume care if they were a previous client), and then they let me know that they are having some spotting. Spotting in and of itself can indicate an impending miscarriage, or it can be indicative of an irritated cervix, or it can be sign of a “subchorionic hematoma” (which usually results in spotting/bleeding without harming the baby, and resolves on its own). Quite honestly, if a miscarriage is going to occur, there really isn’t much that you can do, as oftentimes if it is indeed going to progress into a miscarriage then the baby has already died by the point you are experiencing spotting. But the unknown is not easy, as you want to KNOW what is going on. Our options at this point include doing labwork to see where the progesterone and Hcg levels are by now and going in to an OBGYN or an ER for an ultrasound (usually this is a vaginal ultrasound in order to get the best look at the uterus in early pregnancy). If the mom is 5 or 6 weeks or more, they should be able to visualize the baby, and be able to tell if the heart is beating, and labwork can reveal whether the pregnancy hormones are continuing to increase as they should. If mom prefers to wait, then there are some herbs that can be taken, and some moms choose to also use progesterone cream to help support the body until we know for sure what is going on.

If the ultrasound or labwork shows that miscarriage is inevitable, then I try to offer support and encouragement while the mom walks through the next several days. In most cases, mom is able to pass the baby on her own, and we stay in touch via phone or email. Spotting usually progresses into bleeding, and cramps accompany the bleeding as the cervix dilates enough to pass everything, which typically happens within a week of the initial spotting. In the event that it takes a longer amount of time, then we can use herbs to help encourage things to move along, we closely monitor for infection, and occasionally we need to transfer to an OBGYN for further care.

Once a miscarriage has taken place, I really encourage moms to take it easy, and make sure that they give their body time to heal both physically and emotionally. Oftentimes a mom can be left feeling very tired and anemic, as the body usually loses a significant amount of blood, and the intensity of labor can leave her worn out. There is also the emotional side of processing the loss, and this combined with the hormonal swings that go along with pregnancy followed by delivery can create quite a roller coaster of emotions to work with, and mom needs to know that this is normal and okay…and that her body is grieving and adjusting, which takes time!

The good news is that a previous miscarriage in and of itself does not negatively affect care for a future pregnancy. As I mentioned before, we usually don’t know what the root cause was, but there are many moms who go on to carry a healthy pregnancy following a miscarriage. Sometimes it can help a mom to relax more if she has more frequent monitoring during the early weeks of pregnancy after a miscarriage, and I am glad to do progesterone and Hcg testing to make sure that these levels are increasing like they should during the initial weeks. Oftentimes these moms also want to get an ultrasound performed earlier, in order to know that everything is looking good and that baby is growing like he should. Other than these factors, there isn’t much different for prenatal care, unless a mom has had several miscarriages in a row.

If a mom has had several repeat miscarriages, I highly recommend consulting with a NaPro Fertility Specialist (these providers concentrate on helping to achieve and maintain correct hormonal balance in order to prepare a mom’s body for and help in maintaining pregnancy). Many moms have inadequate progesterone levels, and having a specialist helping to monitor levels and provide prescription strength progesterone when needed can be a tremendous blessing, and prevent the trauma of further losses.

In closing, here are some suggestions if you are walking through a miscarriage:

  • Drink red raspberry leaf tea frequently in order to help balance your hormones and increase your iron as you recover (although stop drinking if you become pregnant again, until you reach the second trimester).
  • Take Evening Primrose Oil to help regulate hormones and support the body.
  • Consider taking an herbal-based iron supplement for several weeks to help restore your iron levels.
  • Take time to rest, don’t push yourself too hard, drink a lot of fluid, and take time to reflect on the short life you were given to carry, and allow yourself time to recuperate and heal before trying to resume your normal responsibilities.
  • Check out these sites that have further tips: Healing After Miscarriage and Healing Naturally.

And if you are preparing for pregnancy following a miscarriage, here are some ways to support your body:

  • Take folate (not synthetic folic acid!) and methylated B vitamins regularly.
  • Start taking a high-quality plant-based (not synthetic!) prenatal vitamin to build your body’s supply of needed vitamins and minerals.
  • Look into the benefits of using a quality, natural based over-the-counter progesterone cream to help promote healthy progesterone levels.
  • Consider having some herbal tincture on hand (such as C & B formula from Mountain Meadow Herbs) that you could take at the first sign of any cramping or spotting-this tincture helps to calm the uterus.
  • Check out this blog post for more practical tips: Preventing Miscarriage

In closing, would you have any suggestions you would add? If you have experienced a miscarriage, what was the best information and advice you were given? Any suggestions for moms hoping to get pregnant soon after going through a loss? I’d love to hear your answers if you would be willing to share!